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Report released on costs of animal disease
Public health vets voice support 

A white paper entitled The Costs of Animal Disease, released by the International Federation for Animal Health, has revealed the costs of animal disease.

The report acknowledges that some progress is being made into disease control and eradication, but calls for improved surveillance and veterinary services on a global scale, a greater understanding of regulatory effects of animal disease policies, and more improved collaboration between key stakeholders.

The paper, intended to kickstart discussion on disease impact and control, has won the support of public health vets. Andy Peters, head of GALVmed, welcomed the call for greater global collaboration and cited its importance in alleviating the impact of neglected animal diseases in developing countries, saying that "the scale of some of these diseases can be hard to comprehend."

John Lawrence, president of the Veterinary Public Health Association (VPHA), also voiced his support: "The need for further research, improved surveillance and an integrated stance to tackling disease, especially where it has the potential to affect human health are cornerstones in taking a one health approach. Applying these principles to the control of disease, including how regulation is drafted by governments, is paramount."

Furthermore, Kenneth Clarke, past president of the VPHA, urged the veterinary profession to back the report, saying: "The profession must ensure governments and international organisations are aware of these recommendations and should actively promote them to improve the wellbeing of animals and humans in all countries."

The report is available here

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Amur leopard cubs caught on camera

News Story 1
 A pair of Amur leopards have been captured on camera for the first time since their birth. The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland announced the birth in July, but with human presence being kept to a minimum, it was not known how many cubs had been born.

Motion sensitive cameras have now revealed that two cubs emerged from the den - at least one of which may be released into the wild in Russia within the next two or three years. The Amur leopard habitat is not open to the public, to help ensure the cubs retain their wild instincts and behaviour. Image © RZSS 

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News Shorts
New canine and feline dentistry manual announced

A new canine and feline dentistry and oral surgery manual has been published by the BSAVA. Announcing the news on its website, the BSAVA said this latest edition contains new step-by-step operative techniques, together with full-colour illustrations and photographs.

‘This is a timely publication; veterinary dentistry is a field that continues to grow in importance for the general veterinary practitioner,’ the BSAVA said. ‘The manual has been fully revised and updated to include the most relevant, evidence-based techniques.’

The BSAVA Manual of Canine and Feline Dentistry and Oral Surgery, 4th edition is available to purchase from www.bsava.com/shop