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Report released on costs of animal disease
Public health vets voice support 

A white paper entitled The Costs of Animal Disease, released by the International Federation for Animal Health, has revealed the costs of animal disease.

The report acknowledges that some progress is being made into disease control and eradication, but calls for improved surveillance and veterinary services on a global scale, a greater understanding of regulatory effects of animal disease policies, and more improved collaboration between key stakeholders.

The paper, intended to kickstart discussion on disease impact and control, has won the support of public health vets. Andy Peters, head of GALVmed, welcomed the call for greater global collaboration and cited its importance in alleviating the impact of neglected animal diseases in developing countries, saying that "the scale of some of these diseases can be hard to comprehend."

John Lawrence, president of the Veterinary Public Health Association (VPHA), also voiced his support: "The need for further research, improved surveillance and an integrated stance to tackling disease, especially where it has the potential to affect human health are cornerstones in taking a one health approach. Applying these principles to the control of disease, including how regulation is drafted by governments, is paramount."

Furthermore, Kenneth Clarke, past president of the VPHA, urged the veterinary profession to back the report, saying: "The profession must ensure governments and international organisations are aware of these recommendations and should actively promote them to improve the wellbeing of animals and humans in all countries."

The report is available here

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Rare chimp birth announced at Edinburgh Zoo

News Story 1
 The Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) welcomed the birth of a critically endangered western chimpanzee on Monday 3 February at Edinburgh Zoo's Budongo Trail.

The baby girl will be named in the coming days through a public vote, and staff will carry out a paternity test during its first health check to determine the father.

Mother Heleen's first infant, Velu, was born in 2014, making this new baby only the second chimpanzee born in Scotland for more than 20 years.

Budongo Trail team leader Donald Gow said: "While we celebrate every birth, this one is particularly special because our new arrival is a critically endangered Western chimpanzee, a rare subspecies of chimpanzee."

Image (c) RZSS/Donald Gow. 

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BEVA offering free membership to vet students

The British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA) is offering free membership to veterinary students. As part of a new initiative with the aim of encouraging more veterinary professionals into equine practice.

According to BEVA, less than one in ten veterinary students choose to work in equine practice. The association hopes that this initiative will provide insight into the field and the benefits of a career in equine medicine.

Benefits of membership include:
▪ access to a network of nearly 3,000 members
▪ special student rates to attend BEVA Congress
▪ online access to BEVA's Equine Veterinary Education (EVE) journal
▪ free access to the association's online learning platform
▪ free access to BEVA's practical veterinary apps
▪ exclusive discounts on a range of things from cinema tickets to grocery shopping.

BEVA will be releasing a series of short videos over the next few months from BEVA Council members, explaining what inspired them to work in equine practice.

Image (c) BEVA.