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Horse crisis report published
Horse welfare charities call on government and public help

A landmark report, entitled Left On The Verge: the approaching Equine Crisis in England and Wales, suggests that around 6000 horses will be at risk this winter, and charities will be physically unable to cope with the increasing numbers of horses being abandoned, neglected or abused.

In the report, horse welfare charities call on the public to help rehome horses; for horse owners to take responsibility for their animals and not pass the problem onto local authorities, charities and landowners; and for the Government and other agencies to help rein in the problem before winter sets in and hundreds of horses and ponies suffer.

All major horse organisations have seen a rise in numbers. The RSPCA took in more than twice the number of horses between April 2011 and March 2012 as it did the previous year; World Horse Welfare has seen the numbers of horses taken into its centres rise by 50% since 2006 and has to restrict admissions; Redwings has seen a 28 per cent increase in equine intake since 2006 and abandonments rise from 160 in 2009 to 450 in 2011. Furthermore, last winter, HorseWorld saw a threefold increase in the number of abandoned and neglected horses it rescued compared with the previous year.

Overbreeding and the current economic climate are thought to have contributed to what Nicolas de Brauwere, Head of Welfare at Redwings Horse Sanctuary and Chairman of the National Equine Welfare Council, has called "an extremely serious state of affairs."

Meanwhile, Roly Owers, chief executive of World Horse Welfare, commented: “The organisations are already at breaking point with a severe shortage of available places and we are aware of an additional 6,000 horses which could be at risk over the winter.

“These are all groups of horses that are on the edge of becoming welfare concerns, either because their owners are struggling to look after them or because they are not getting the care they need and ownership is unclear. We could not cope if even a fraction of this number needed to be rescued.

“We are urging members of the public who can offer a horse a home to please do so now.”

To read the report, click here.

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Nominations for 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards now open

News Story 1
 People across the UK are being urged to nominate a standout animal champion for the 2019 RSPCA Honours Awards.

The awards recognise those who have worked tirelessly to improve animal welfare, campaigned on behalf of animals, or shown true bravery. Previous winners include comedian John Bishop, who was awarded Celebrity Animal Champion of the Year, and 11-year-old Lobby Cantwell, who raised more than £1,000 for the charity through mountain climbs and bike rides.

To submit a nomination or find out more about the awards visit the RSPCA website. Nominations will remain open until 4 pm on Friday, March 15.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New £1m project to investigate dairy cow lameness

Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) is leading a new £1 million research project to investigate the causes of lameness in dairy cows.

One in three dairy cows are affected by lameness every day in the UK, costing the industry an estimated £250 milion annually.

The project will take three years to complete and is due to finish by November 2021.

Professor Georgios Banos of SRUC commented: “In addition to pain and discomfort to the animal, lameness is associated with decreased milk production and inflated farm costs.

“Among cows raised in the same environment, some become lame while others do not. Understanding the reasons behind this will help us develop targeted preventive practices contributing to enhanced animal welfare and farm profitability.”