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Reverse zoonosis causes concern
reverse zoonosis concern influenza flu season transmission illness
Humans must beware of passing flu on to their pets

The concept of reverse zoonosis, in which humans can pass illness on to their pets, is causing concern with the approach of the influenza (flu) season.

Many people do not realise they can not only pass flu on to other humans when they get sick, but also animals, including dogs, cats and ferrets.

Scientists and vets hope to help prevent reverse zoonosis by raising awareness of the issue.

It is well known that animals such as pigs and birds introduce new strains of flu to humans, such as the most recent H1N1 flu strain, however, it is less known that humans have further passed these on to other animals.

There is currently little known about reverse zoonosis by scientists and vets, however researchers at Oregon State University (OSU) and Iowa State University are looking at this type of disease transmission.

"We worry a lot about zoonosis, the transmission of diseases from animals to people," said Christine Loehr, an associate professor at the OSU College of Veterinary Medicine. "Any time you have infection of a virus into a new species, it's a concern, a black box of uncertainty.

"We don't know for sure what the implications might be, but we do think this deserves more attention."

Professor Loehr advises that people with flu-like symptoms distance themselves from their pets in future.

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News Story 1
 Motivation comes from the top. No matter how hard you try to motivate your staff, you will struggle to succeed if they see de-motivation at the head of their practice.

A de-motivated or negative manager or owner can be a cancer in the practice spreading their poor attitude among their staff.

To read the full blog visit: www.vetcommunity.com  

News Shorts
Magna Barka receives stamp of approval

One of Britain's most important documents, the Magna Carta, turns 800 this year. To celebrate, Battersea Dogs and Cats Home has launched the 'Magna Barka'.

The document sets out the rights of dogs and cats to a suitable environment, constant access to food and water, medical attention and regular vet visits, the ability to express normal behaviours and protection from fear and distress.

Two Battersea dogs, shar pei cross Magna and lurcher Carta, went to the Runnymede fields where the Magna Carta was sealed in 1215, to stamp their paw of approval on the Magna Barka.