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RSPCA warns of knock-on effect
Milk price cuts will affect dairy cow welfare

Shoppers have been urged by the RSPCA to avoid purchasing cut-price milk in the supermarkets as it could have a knock-on effect on dairy cow welfare.

From August this year, it is expected that the price farmers should expect to be paid for the milk they produce will be around 5 pence less per litre than current earnings. Some supermarkets have contracts with farmers where the price of milk is linked to the cost of production; however, those who do not will be affected the most.

The main worry for the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is that the drop in price will badly impact the welfare of dairy cows.

Deputy Head of the RSPCA’s farm animal science team and former dairy herdsman, John Avizienius, said: “Although a drop in cost of milk and cheap deals might seem like great news for shoppers we are concerned that ultimately it will be cows which will pay the price.

“Farmers cannot produce milk at a loss, it’s simply not sustainable, they cannot survive like that. We are in the ridiculous situation where milk is cheaper than bottled water at some supermarkets - that simply cannot be right.

“I believe shoppers would be even happy to pay an extra one or two pence on a pint of milk if it safeguarded dairy cow welfare.”



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Thousands take part in annual bee count

News Story 1
 Over 280,000 bees have been recorded so far in this year’s Great British Bee Count, with more than 15,000 people taking part. One nature lover in Surrey even spotted and photographed a rare long-horned bee, which is a UK priority species for conservation. Verified sightings will be shared with academic researchers and ecologists.

To take part, download the app from: https://www.foe.co.uk/bee-count

Photo © Chris Brown  

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Pet oxygen masks now carried by all East Sussex fire engines

Two charities have teamed up to ensure all fire engines in East Sussex carry a specialist pet oxygen mask as part of their standard practice. Smokey Paws raises money for the kits via public donations, company sponsorships and fundraisers, but has now joined forces with the RSPCA to help roll the scheme out across the UK.