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Vets urged to be aware of the signs of animal abuse
‘Veterinarians must be alert to recognise signs of animal abuse' - Ira Roth.

Paper describes abuse case first diagnosed as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease

Veterinary professionals are being urged to be aware of the signs of animal abuse and to understand the link between human and animal abuse.

Writing in the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association, vets from the University of Georgia’s College of Veterinary Medicine describe a case of animal abuse, which was first diagnosed as Legg-Calve-Perthes disease.

On initial presentation, a dog - a one-year-old male shitzu - was non-weight bearing in the right limb. An ophthalmic exam also revealed a corneal ulcer in the right eye and blood in the anterior chamber.

Radiographs of the right limb indicated avascular necrosis (AVN) on the right hip, with resilient fracture and possible AVN on the left side.

Twenty days later, the dog returned for evaluation of acute lameness in the left leg. Radiographs revealed a left display femur Salter-Harris type II fracture, a non-disposed healing right pubic fracture and a healing right zygomatic arch transverse fracture.

‘The dog's initial injuries were attributed to a routine fall at home, and radiographic interpretation suggested that this was plausible,’ writes author Ira Roth, a clinical assistant professor in the department of small animal medicine and surgery.

'Subsequent patient visits, evaluation of additional injuries, and interviews with the owner indicated that both animal and domestic abuse had occurred. Veterinarians must be alert to recognise signs of animal abuse and must be aware of the connection between animal and domestic abuse'.

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Hedgehog project launched at Edinburgh campus

News Story 1
 The University of Edinburgh has launched a hedgehog-friendly project at its Easter Bush Campus, which is home to the Roslin Institute and the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies.

A survey is being carried out at the campus to assess how many hedgehogs are in the area. A team of around 20 volunteers installed 10 small tunnels in different locations and they will track footprints to gauge hedgehog presence.

Landscape experts are also creating habitats where the mammals can eat, shelter and breed. It is hoped that student projects will be developed at an open day on 12 October. 

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News Shorts
ASF traces found in seized meat at NI airport

More than 300kg of illegal meat and dairy products were seized at Northern Irelandís airports in June, DAERA has revealed.

A sample of these were tested at the Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, resulting in the detection of African swine fever DNA fragments.

DAERA said that while the discovery does not pose a significant threat to Northern Irelandís animal health status, it underlines the importance of controls placed on personal imports of meat and dairy products. Holidaymakers travelling overseas are being reminded not to bring any animal or plant products back home.