Cookie use on MRCVSonline
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you continue without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to receive all cookies.
If you would like to forward this story on to a friend, simply fill in the form below and click send.

Your friend's email:
Your email:
Your name:
 
 
Send Cancel

Hope for non-animal testing

Skin model proves a successful testing method

Researchers have found that a model replicating the traits of human skin could provide a replacement for animals in future clinical research.

A study taking place at the Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO) in Belgium, found that a skin sensitisation assay can successfully identify chemicals causing human allergic responses.

The research team used a three-dimensional, human-derived skin model, which replicates key traits of normal human skin.

This could replace the use of guinea pigs or mice, which are injected with or have substances applied to their skin to determine allergic reactions.

Researchers found that the model accurately predicated each chemical's ability to cause an allergic response for all of the compounds tested.

These findings support those reported by Michigan-based research organisation, CeeTox, who created the skin sensitisation assay.

Further validation studies will be carried out, and the results are to be submitted to the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods, which officially approves the methods of chemical testing required by law.

The announcement follows a recent ban in Europe on the sale of cosmetics that have been tested on animals.

Related News
Committee to advise on research animals
Animals for scientific procedures consultation

Become a member or log in to add this story to your CPD history

Registrations open for overseas veterinary professionals course

News Story 1
 Registrations are now open for the RCVS CPD course for overseas veterinary professionals, which covers an introduction to the UK veterinary professions.

The course is aimed at overseas-qualified veterinary surgeons and nurses during their first two years of working in the UK, in addition to those considering working here. It provides graduates with the key information and skills required to practice in the UK, as well as helping them understand their legal duties as veterinary professionals.

For more information and to book your place please click here. The course will be held at Belgravia House, London, on Wednesday 12 June.  

Click here for more...
News Shorts
New online guides provide advice for dog owners

A series of downloadable leaflets for dog owners have been produced by veterinary charity PetSavers in a bid to reduce the temptation to seek advice online.

The series entitled ‘My Dog’s Got’ offers practical information on an array of topics, including ‘My dog has dental disease,’ ‘My dog has itchy skin,’ and My dog has kidney disease.’

The new guides can be downloaded here. Printed versions of the new guides can be ordered by veterinary practices in exchange for a donation to PetSavers.